4th Street Fantasy…
continues June 22-24, 2012 in Minneapolis, MN
Thursday, June 21, 2012
3:00 PM – 5:00 PMJewelry with Elise
Our very talented and generous Elise Matthesen has offered to teach a jewelry making class for any registered 4th Streeter at no cost. [This is indeed a generous gift from Elise!] Bring your own tools and materials. If you have any questions head over to her LiveJournal post.
8:00 PM –Storytelling
For this year's welcoming party we are going to hear stories. And we'll be the ones telling them. We'll use the "pick, play, or pass" approach as we usually do with the music party. Each person will be able to ask someone in the circle to tell a story, pass the turn on to the next person, or tell a story. Stories can be true, made up, or classic. If you've got a good tale, bring it along; notes are allowed. Your story might come in the form of a tale, a joke, a poem, or a song. Have fun with it! We may not get all the way around the circle, but we'll make some good fun together!
Friday, June 22, 2012
9:00 AM – 1:30 PMWriter's Seminar: Storytelling
The Writer's Seminar schedule can be found over here.
5:00 PM – 5:30 PMWelcome!
... to 4th Street 2012. Join us for a few opening remarks, after which the party really starts.
5:30 PM – 6:30 PMStory Templates and the Folk Process

Patricia C. Wrede
(Moderating)

Dana M. Baird

Tim Cooper

Oneal Isaac

Tom Whitmore

It seems like every story, ballad, or epic that's endured for a significant amount of time has been recast and retold repeatedly. Is the folk process necessary to these stories' survival? Is it cultural omnipresence that brings us back to the likes of Robin Hood, Cinderella, and Tam Lin (or, in other cultures, the Monkey King, Coyote, or Baba Yaga) again and again, or do the characters and narrative templates found in these stories share a common resonance? How does the oral folk process (in songs and spoken storytelling) affect our written use of these stories?
8:00 PM – 9:00 PMPOV Fixes Everything

Beth Meacham
(Moderating)

Alec Austin

Emma Bull

Steven Brust

Scott Lynch

Various Scribblies have advanced the claim that 'POV fixes everything'. The readers of recent sprawling fantasy series might take issue with this. What sorts of problems can the careful and intelligent use of POV resolve? What sorts of challenges does choosing a specific POV (or an ever-expanding set of POVs) to use for your story create?
9 PM –Welcome Reception and Evening Merriment
Begin your evening in the ConSuite sharing munchies, libations, and your stories since last we saw you. Continue with songs and good conversations.
Saturday, June 23, 2011
9:30 AM – 10:30 AMPolitics, Complexity, and Fantasy

Marissa Lingen
(Moderating)

Marie Brennan

Alec Austin

Sarah Monette

Susan Palwick

Fantasy sometimes seems to have a love/hate relationship with politics: It often wants to deal with grand political issues (revolutions, alliances, continent-spanning conflicts) without addressing the complexities of governance. What challenges do authors face when trying to depict political scenarios? Are there modes of governance or types of conflict that are particularly challenging to work into fiction? Do long-running series, like C.J. Cherryh's Atevi books, allow for more robust depictions of politics and diplomacy?
11:00 AM – 12:00 PMTeens, Work, & Fantasy

Anne Gwin
(Moderating)

Stella Evans

Ellen Klages

Ginger Weil

Patricia C. Wrede

In the historical periods many secondary worlds are based on, the concept of adulthood was different than it is now, and teens and pre-teens were often part of the workforce or the military. How are these issues addressed (or glossed over) in fantasy? How do our modern, first-world, and genre sensibilities affect how children and teenagers are depicted in fantasy?
1:30 PM – 2:30 PMGet Your Reality Out of My Fantasy

Lynne M. Thomas
(Moderating)

David Grouchy

Scott Lynch

Beth Meacham

Caroline Stevermer

Some authors insist on dragging readers through the grim, harsh realities of their world in ways that can be tiresome, or even abhorrent. Is there an argument to be made for "letting fantasy be fantasy", without dragging the real world into it? Even if we can't avoid considering certain aspects of reality, do we want or need more exuberance in the genre? What would stories that are more "pure fantasy" and play to the genre's core strengths look like?
3:00 PM – 4:00 PMAccessibility, Genre, and Depth

Michael Merriam
(Moderating)

Elizabeth Bear

Chris Modzelewski

John Scalzi

Making fantasy accessible to new readers without making it seem simple or "dumbed down" to a more experienced audience can be challenging. What can we learn from the burgeoning YA genre? What are some techniques for ensuring new readers won't feel like they've been thrown in the deep end, and to what extent can these techniques be reconciled with the intertextual complexity and deconstruction of genre tropes that experienced readers often desire?
4:30 PM – 5:30 PMCollaborations & Shared Worlds

Emma Bull
(Moderating)

Steven Brust

John Scalzi

Will Shetterly

Skyler White

How different are the motivations behind collaborating with another writer, working in a shared world, or writing tie-in work or fan-fiction? Does the stigma that's often attached to tie-in work and fanfic have anything to do with the drive to create it? What can the rhetoric surrounding originality, work-for-hire, and other related issues tell us about how the collaborative process is understood by non-participants?
7:30 PM – 9:00 PMFamilies, Festivals, and Fireworks

Elizabeth Bear
(Moderating)

Catherine Lundoff

Elise Matthesen

Jon Singer

Michael D. Thomas

A different angle on the "Three Fs" panel we've had every year since 4th Street's return. What cool things do our panelists know about families, festivals, and fireworks (treating fireworks as a stand-in for imported and repurposed technology) that would be good to see in books or are just neat to talk about? How have work, family life, celebrations, and international trade interacted with each other historically and in fiction?
Evening...Tea, Music, and Conversation...
The rest of the evening, as usual, is fairly unstructured. We have the rooms all night to use as we will.
Sunday, June 24, 2012
9:30 AM – 10:30 AMScience, Technology, and Fantasy

Ellen Klages
(Moderating)

Marissa Lingen

Chris Modzelewski

Sarah Monette

Catherine Schaffer

There is a tendency for fantasy to depict worlds mired in technological stasis, or to imagine magic and technology as polar opposites. Even when authors combine the two, as in more fantastic end of steampunk, they often choose to reproduce a subset of ideas from our world and prior art. What are some of the sources of this approach toward technology in fantasy? What sorts of narrative opportunities open up when you introduce disruptive technologies, magical or otherwise, into a fantasy story?
11:00 AM – 12:00 PMBlood, Love, and Rhetoric

Marie Brennan
(Moderating)

Pamela Dean

Kit Gordon

Mary Robinette Kowal

Inez Schaechterle

A character in Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are Dead claimed that:
"I can do you blood and love without the rhetoric, and I can do you blood and rhetoric without the love, and I can do you all three concurrent or consecutive, but I can't do you love and rhetoric without the blood. Blood is compulsory — they're all blood, you see."
Is blood (that is to say, direct, dramatic conflict) actually necessary for stories to 'work'? What about Love and Rhetoric? Are narrative templates that rely on blood just more familiar, or is there a deeper reason why domestic narratives in fantasy are hard to pull off?
1:30 PM – 3:00 PMAnother Panel

To be decided
on the fly

Yup, you guessed it... the time slot left open for one of those topics that would otherwise derail or consume another panel that we deferred for another time.
4:00 PM – 4:30 PMThanks and What about 2013?
Closing words, thoughts, etc. Also, we'll talk a little about what we're thinking for 2013.
Evening...Dead Dog Party
We've got the rooms, so use 'em!